Train To Birmingham

Album: Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns (2011)
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  • American folk-rock singer-songwriter John Hiatt wrote this song in his late teens, but it didn't make it onto a disc until his 2011 album Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns. He explained why he finally decided to record the track in an interview with American Songwriter: "You know what, my wife really loves the song. And she's been asking me to record it for years, and it kind of seemed right on this record. We were doing all of these songs about cities and different locations and going from the city and the country and back and forth. It's our 25th wedding anniversary this year back in June, so I just thought I'd record this song for her."
  • Hiatt told the story of how he came to pen a train song to American Songwriter: "I wrote it when I was about 19. I'd been in Nashville a year — I came to Nashville when I was about 18, and I was writing for Tree Publishing Company, and I wasn't a country songwriter by any stretch, but I was surrounded by those guys. Like Bobby Braddock, who wrote a lot of George Jones and Tammy Wynette hits. And Curly Putnam,who wrote 'Green Green Grass of Home' and 'Red Lane,' all these hit country songwriters of the day. I was writing my little folk songs, or whatever they hell they were, and I was trying to pick up the craft, at any rate, and I said, 'Well how do you write a country song?' and one of them said one day, 'Well, you gotta have a train song.' And I though well s--t, I think I can write a song about a train. And back in those days on Music Row, all the publishing companies were just in little houses, and the songwriters lived right next door. I lived in a little house with four or five other writers, and none of us were really country writers. One guy was from upstate New York trying to get some rock and roll thing going. Those were some real interesting times in Nashville, as it always is. But this one guy was from Birmingham and he kept going home every damn weekend like he couldn't stand to be away. And I just though well s--t, there's my 'Train To Birmingham.'"
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