(Mortis)

  • This Ennio Morricone-inspired Spaghetti Western instrumental interlude features a sample of guitarist Serge Pizzorno's grandfather, Wilf Dillon, reciting some Latin. He says "in mortis ora incerta est," which translates as, "the hour of death is uncertain."

    Pizzorno told BBC: "There's something powerful about a 94-year-old man saying that."

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