Leave Me Alone

Album: Not for Church Folk! (2001)
  • Judging by our 2010 interview, Millie Jackson is a very strong-willed and independent woman. She tried marriage, but it lasted just 8 months because, "He thought he was gonna tell me what to do with my life, and I decided that was not gonna happen."
    In this song, Jackson explains that being alone isn't always a bad thing. She told us: "One of my favorite songs is 'Leave Me Alone,' and that lasts about 20 minutes between talking to the audience and doing the song itself: 'Just because I'm alone don't mean I'm lonely. I'm a woman with a goal, and I gotta be free. Why in the hell is solitude such a mystery? Just because I'm alone don't mean I'm lonely. Leave me alone.' And I do it because I find that a lot of women my age now feel the same way. You know, can I please be by myself? One of the lines I like in this song is 'Don't try to sell me nothing, it gets me excited, don't bring your ass to my house if you haven't been invited. Leave me alone.'"

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