Somebody Shoulda Heard Me

Album: Rock N' Soul (1994)

Songfacts®:

  • In a Songfacts interview with Millie Jackson the R&B star explained that she gets bored easily, which is why she experiments with different genres of music and writes songs on a variety of topics. She considers this one of her more meaningful songs, saying: "I got another song I wrote called 'Somebody shoulda heard me holler, somebody shoulda heard me yell. Somebody should heard me call their name, now somebody can just go to hell, because I'm heading down the highway of happiness, on a one-way street to destruction. If I get lost, I don't care. My life is under construction.' Somebody shoulda heard me. It's about a teenager running away and nobody there to catch him, to show him the right path. Somebody shoulda seen that the things that the child was doing were not just done to be done, but were done for the sake of getting attention."
  • Jackson wrote this with producer Brad Shapiro, who writes the music to many of Jacksons songs.

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