Dixie Avenue

Album: Volunteer (2018)

Songfacts®:

  • This tribute to the place in Virginia where OCMS's Ketch Secor and Critter Fuqua first fell in love with music was produced by Dave Cobb, who is known for his work with Jason Isbell and Chris Stapleton.

    "This is a song that really celebrates the Ketch and Critter story," Secor told Billboard. "When you've been writing music for 28 years with somebody like we have, it's like, good God, where did the time go? I feel about 28, certainly not like I'm pushing 40. But one of the things we really have going for us in Old Crow is time, both as the lifetime of our institution but even more than that the kind of music we play. When we showed the song to Dave I thought it was going to be more pop. I thought this could get on the radio, but Dave said, 'Let's treat this like Johnny Horton.' That made more sense to me, so we went after that sound for it."

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