Boom Boom (Out Go The Lights)

Album: The Best of Pat Travers (1983)
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  • Lyrics
  • Studio and live versions of "Boom Boom (Out Go The Lights)" were recorded by Pat Travers, both uptempo with some fine axework, and, one might think, this was a happy sort of song. In fact it has a somewhat dark origin. Written by harmonica player Stan Lewis it was recorded by another harmonica player, Little Walter on Chess Records. Marion Walter Jacobs (1930-68) was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall Of Fame in 2008.

    Listening to the song with a bit of nous reveals that it is actually about a taboo subject - spousal abuse; the boom is the punch, and out go the young lady's lights. Oops! >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England
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Comments: 4

  • Rob from Wilmington, NcWell now, come on Ken, it's just a song, and not even written by Pat. How many blues songs are written about bad things? What about Hey Joe by Hendrix? Do you think he's really going to go "shoot his old lady"? Does that make Jimi a murderer? Not saying that I approve of domestic violence of even tacitly stay silent about it, but context man, context.
  • Paul from Cypress, TxDude, if your looking for politically correct blues/rock & roll, try the Beiber. Or go chirp about rap crap.
  • Willie from Scottsdale, AzSame guy who wrote "Snortin' Whiskey, Drinking Cocaine." Class act all around.
  • Ken from Pittsburgh, PaSo the song is basically promoting domestic violence? I feel sorry for the women who cross paths with this "man", Mr Travers.
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