Bulletproof

Album: The Love & War MasterPeace (2010)
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  • This is the first single from American R&B singer-songwriter Raheem DeVaughn's third studio album, The Love & War MasterPeace. The song features rapper Ludacris and samples Curtis Mayfield's 1970 track, "The Other Side of Town."
  • DeVaughn explained in publicity materials: "I named the album The Love & War MasterPeace because I feel that where I am as a person and where we are as a people, we are all trying to master that internal peace and happiness in a very strange time." This song follows the politically minded thread of the album, addressing the social ills of the times.
  • DeVaughn told MTV News that Ludacris has been very supportive of his work from the beginning and when he sent him the record the rapper recorded his verse without even asking to get paid. He said: "He did the record with us doing no business or none of that, like, 'Yo, I gotta get paid right now.' It was like, 'Yo, I'm really feeling this and whatever I could do to make it work [I will].' And he's done that."
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