Alligator Aviator Autopilot Antimatter

Album: Collapse Into Now (2011)
  • This propulsive rocker features Peaches on vocals ("as the inner voice of teenage testosterone," Michael Stipe said). The band hooked up with the Canadian Electro-diva after vocalist Stipe bumped into her in a Berlin bar.
  • Stipe's stream-of-conscious lyrics are summed up by the nonsensical song title. It compares with another R.E.M. track with scattergun words, "It's the End of the World As We Know It."
  • The song features added guitar from veteran musician/producer and long-time Patti Smith collaborator Lenny Kaye. Said Peter Buck to Mojo magazine: "Lenny nailed it. I'm really proud that I get to play with a guy who's been such a big influence on my life. With the exception of the Beatles and Stones, anyone I've ever respected since 1972 I've played with: Bruce Springsteen, Neil Young, Patti Smith, Warren Zevon, Roger McGuinn, I've played with The Replacements, Husker Du, John Fogerty... to have actually been on stage playing guitar with these guys - man, how lucky did I get?"

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