Let Me Entertain You

Album: Life Thru A Lens (1997)

Songfacts®:

  • Robbie Williams' lyrics for "Let Me Entertain You" are mostly innuendoes and entendre. Literally it is Williams recounting an attempt to get a girl to cheat on her boyfriend with him. It doubles up as the self-preening singer winking at us about his camp, egotistic image. (In the US a compilation album was released the following year featuring all his hits to date. It was titled The Ego Has Landed.)
  • Williams and his then-writing partner Guy Chambers wrote this song after watching the Rolling Stones film Rock and Roll Circus. The singer recalled: "When we started writing the demo there was a furious jungle beat underneath it. It was so hardcore it got me very excited, and I still get excited listening to it now. It's not really heavy metal, it's more like camp rock opera!"
  • "Let Me Entertain You" has become Williams' signature concert opener for most of his shows. His performances of the song include at the Brit Awards' opening act in 1999, as the opening act for Queen Elizabeth II's 2012 Diamond Jubilee Concert and in front of billions of viewers at the 2018 FIFA World Cup opening ceremony held in Moscow.

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