Good Times

Album: Ain't That Good News (1964)
Charted: 11
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  • Lyrics
  • This was one of the last songs Cooke wrote and recorded before he was killed on December 11, 1964. One of Cooke's lighter songs, it's about enjoying oneself at a party. It's an example of one of Cooke's songs that was accessible to white audiences, who he appealed to while retaining an R&B base.
  • The Rolling Stones recorded this in 1965 on their album Out Of Our Heads. Ian Stewart played marimbas on their version. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Bertrand - Paris, France, for all above
  • Journey recorded this song with the Tower of Power horn section and backing vocals by Annie Sampson and Jo Baker of the band Stoneground. Sam Cooke's vocal style was a big influence on Journey lead singer Steve Perry, and in 1978 the band performed the song on the King Biscuit Flower Hour radio show.
  • There are two different mixes. The album version has a more laid-back and stripped-down feel with Cooke overdubbing his own backing vocals. The single version has an extra guitar line as well as handclaps and backing vocals from the Soul Stirrers, the gospel group that gave Sam Cooke his start. As of 2016, all CD releases have used the album version. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    David - AZ
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Comments: 1

  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyThis record was the middle one of three straight records by Sam that peaked at #11, thus just missing making the Top Ten. In order they were 'Little Red Rooster, 'Good Times', and 'Good News'. Interestingly, all three also stayed in the Top 100 for ten weeks...
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