Jeepster

Album: Electric Warrior (1971)
Charted: 2
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  • Lyrics
  • This music to this song was based on a Howlin' Wolf blues song called "You'll Be Mine," which was written by Willie Dixon. As is typical of many blues songs, there are many sexual references in the lyrics, which are made in the form of car metaphors. In interviews, Marc Bolan acknowledged that he "lifted it from a Howlin' Wolf song."
  • T-Rex lead singer Marc Bolan had left the band's label, Fly Records, and signed with EMI shortly before this was released. This caused some controversy as Fly didn't have Bolan's permission to release the song.
  • Marc Bolan explained: "I don't sing the old rock 'n' roll songs myself. I prefer to change the words and make new songs out of them. That's all 'Jeepster' is."
  • Tony Visconti produced this track. The American went on to do a lot of work with David Bowie.

    Visconti recalled to Uncut in 2016: "When I heard 'Jeepster'. I thought, 'Wow, this is seriously different.' I know there's an old blues song he copied, but he threw in some dramatic melodic and chord changes. The song's in A but the chorus jumps to the key of C – no one in the '50s did that!"
  • According to Tony Visconti, the stomping and rattling at the beginning of the song happened organically and was not overdubbed: a very enthusiastic Marc Bolan jumped up and down as he played guitar, shaking the microphone stands. These kind of noises are typically considered mistakes, but in this case they added to the feel of the song.
  • Protex recorded this for their 1980 album Strange Obsessions.
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Comments: 7

  • Josh from Champaign, IlJeepster was a model of automobile released by Willys-Overland from 1948-1950. The model was intended to be a middle ground between the Jeep model intended for rough off-road utilitarian use and their CJ series (Civilian Jeep). Though I think that Jeepster just fits the song in the poetic sense and I'm sure the focus is on the off-road sense that it will go through rough terrain and objects to reach its destination, that Jaguar of a girl, of course another automobile, known for its sleek and sexy lines and refinement.
  • Diane from Hamilton, OnWhat does "Jeepster for your love" mean?
  • Paul from Rothesay, Nb, CanadaThe percussion heard in the middle part of the song is actually Marc stamping on the floor, or as he once called it "Me doing a little bit of tap dancing"
  • Rick from Houston, TxMy first exposure to any T-Rex song, other than "Bang A Gong". This tune was on the soundtrack, and also used in the movie "Death Proof", directed by Quentin Tarantino. If you have not been exposed to any of the soundtracks from Quentin's movies, you are doing yourself a disservice. He throws together some really good ones.
  • Davie from Paisley, ScotlandThe song was also on the B side of the "something you got" single by Protex. A Bolafide classic, nice one Paul.
  • Paul from Rothesay, Nb, CanadaWalter,

    Bolan often used car/vehicle metaphors in his music, and this is no exception. A "Jeepster" is an actual jeep. When you think of all the things a jeep connotates; travelling over rough terraine, power, masculinity etc...you get what Bolan means by the line "Girl, I'm just a Jeepster for your love". A Bolafide classic!
  • Walter from Antwerp, BelgiumHow many big hitsingles have the line "I'm gonna suck ya" in them? Not too many, I guess. Though I was still a boy at the time, I was very fond of this record, must've been that catchy rhythm. Only still don't know what a "jeepster" is, can somebody please explain?
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