Certanity

Songfacts®:

  • This cinematic psych cut was the first song to be made available from Temples second album. Frontman James Bagshaw said: "When writing the melody for 'Certainty', I wanted to create something with almost an eerie, early Disney vibe, something playful and harmonious, but with a dark twist."

    "Producing the song was as much about layering as it was about sparseness - the verses needed to reveal the thumping motion of the bass and the reflective lyrics, and the melody had to be paired with the right ambience," he continued. "The chorus was approached in an opposite way, layer after layer, thickening the sound. There's a blend between moog bass, and actual bass, and the song switches between synthetic and analogue sounds throughout. The guitar mirrors the synth, and vice versa."

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