Don't Fight the Sea

Album: single release only (2011)
  • songfacts ®
  • Artistfacts ®
  • The four surviving Beach Boys - Al Jardine, Brian Wilson, Mike Love and Bruce Johnston - recorded this song as a charity single to raise money for those affected by the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan. Guitarist Al Jardine had the idea for the release and he approached the rest of the band to record the track, which originally appeared on Jardine's 2010 full-length solo album A Postcard From California. An archived vocal from the late Carl Wilson was also added to the recording.
  • Explaining his choice of song, Jardine commented: "We felt that the song had a nice basic message of friendship. I also like the idea of that song, because the vocals are a bit under- appreciated. So this release was a perfect place to showcase the idea of harmony and friendship. Everybody is behind it 100%, that's the nice part."
  • All proceeds from the single went to the Red Cross's Japanese relief efforts.
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