Forget That Day

Album: Talk Show (1984)
  • Go-Go's guitarist Jane Wiedlin wrote this song. Says Wiedlin: "I was having a romance with this Euro-guy, he was from Holland, I think. They were an opening act for the Go-Go's, and it was as usual for me at the time, another dramatic, tumultuous, everything-has-to-be-high-drama kind of relationship. And it was all taking place on the tour from town to town. I remember that song was written about the town of Lyon in France. And I kind of remember being on a tower with him, and birds were flying around us, and it was raining - it was all very Wuthering Heights. But it's funny, because, you know, I was pretty young when most of these songs were written. I'll still write a dramatic song these days, but my life has become much less dramatic than it was then. One good thing about being young is you have lots of fodder for writing." (Check out our interview with Jane Wiedlin, where she talks about her youthful indiscretions. Her website is janewiedlin.com.)
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