Harvest For The World

Album: Harvest For The World (1976)
Charted: 10 63
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Songfacts®:

  • Written by the Isleys as a group effort, this song is an open-hearted call for equality across the planet. Guitarist and principle lyricist, Ernie Isley, told Uncut: "Harvest For The World refers to a peaceful gathering where every human being is invited, and where no-one will be hindered in any way from participating."

    Keyboardist Jasper Isley added: "At that time, Vietnam had just ended, a lot of people were still missing in action, the economy wasn't great. It was like it is now, there was a big difference between the 'haves' and the 'have-nots.' That's kind of what this song is talking about, asking a rhetorical question, 'When will there be a harvest for the world?' When will there a time that people have an equal share of what's going on, when will they have equality in their lives? Basically we know – the return of Christ, that's when it's going to be, because he's a God of equality so that's when it will ultimately occur. But the song is just asking that question."
  • A cover released by Liverpool group The Christians reached #8 in the UK in 1988, two places higher than the original. All proceeds from their version went to charity.
  • The Christians' version featured an animated video created by four leading animation companies, including Aardman of Wallace and Gromit fame, which won several awards.

Comments: 1

  • Jojo Dancer from At Large Sounds like we need this song now.
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