Warrior's Dance

Album: Invaders Must Die (2009)
Charted: 9

Songfacts®:

  • This song is built around a vocal sample from the 1991 techno anthem "Take Me Away" by True Faith.
  • This was originally written specifically for a Gatecrasher gig that the band were participating in. It was also the first song that Liam Howlett, Keith Flint and Maxim Reality had recorded together for a number of years and the catalyst to get the trio working together again. (The Prodigy's previous album Always Outnumbered, Never Outgunned, featured only Howlett musically). Flint explained to The Guardian February 6, 2009: "It was the anniversary of 20 years of acid house and the rave scene, and we were a genuine part of that - a really significant British youth culture movement. That realization freed us up. We wanted to write something like a bootleg-type retrospective track that represented that, just to play live. It wasn't meant as the start of an album."

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