Burn
by Toto

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Songfacts®:

  • The first single from Toto XIV was penned by vocalist Joseph Williams and keyboardist David Paich. "That came from a song Joseph had written, a whole song," Paich recalled to Billboard magazine, "and I said, 'I really love that.' And he said, 'Oh, you like the song?' I said, 'No, [just] the very little ending.'"

    "There's a piano riff, and that ended up being the riff that is the engine or the heartbeat behind 'Burn' that keeps playing over and over again in that song," Paich added. "That's probably the first song we started writing [specifically] for the new album."
  • Toto considers the Toto XIV an extension of their classic 1982 LP Toto IV. In our interview with David Paich, he said, "It's a more mature and refined Toto, but still rocking."

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