Can't Stop Partying

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  • This R&B rocker was co-written by R&B songwriter Jermaine Dupri. Cuomo explained to MTV News: "Weezer is always trying something new. Last year, we put out The Red Album. We loved that album, but this is 2009. It's time to do something totally different. So I reached out to some friends of mine in different genres: Jermaine Dupri, for example, king of R&B, I wrote a song with him called 'Can't Stop Partying.' It was a real challenge for me, taking his ideas, which are very slick, R&B party [ideas], and giving it some kind of edge, some darkness, making it work with rock, making it work with Weezer."
  • Cuomo recruited the rapper Lil Wayne to contribute a verse. The Weezer frontman explained to MTV News: "We got Lil Wayne to come in and do a rap on it. Any other rapper would've just done, 'Yay, we're partying! Let's drink and have fun,' but he gave it the edge I was looking for. You can hear in his voice, it sounds so dark, like he was gonna get shot or something when he walks out of the studio. So I was real happy that everyone involved got what we were going for."
  • Cuomo told Pitchfork Media that Wayne recorded his verse separately, and that Weezy and Weezer have yet to cross paths. "He sounds like he's totally insane, and not just for the sake of sounding crazy. He's not trying to sound ghetto or gangsta or intellectual. he's just very natural and weird," Cuomo said. "He really tapped into the spirit of the song, which I really struggled with at first… He's rapping about how you can't stop mixing drugs and alcohol, but there are a few words he chooses which are surprising and suggest a terrible end to the party. The last line is: 'I hope the killer doesn't take the life of the party.'"
  • Cuomo told Musicradar.com that this song might be his favorite track on the album. He said: "That was a real interesting challenge. I wrote it with Jermaine Dupri. The whole idea was, 'How can I take my rock guitar approach and marry it with hip-hop?' The combination of me, Jermaine Dupri and Lil Wayne worked beautifully. We came up with something none of us would have come up on our own. It's probably my favorite song on the album."
  • Cuomo included an earlier version of this song, without Lil Wayne, on his 2008 solo release, Alone II: The Home Recordings of Rivers Cuomo.
  • Dupri told Billboard magazine that he's been following Weezer's career since the '90s. "I wrote the song 'Can't Stop Partying' one night, and in my mind, I had always been a big Weezer fan, from the 'Buddy Holly' song they did with that video and Happy Days," he said. "The things Rivers was saying in that record caught me - 'What's with these homies dissing my girl' - he was talking my type of language on a rock record. It was something that always stayed with me." Dupri added: "I was in the studio one night and I was on my wild s--t, like, 'I can't stop partying' - that's exactly how I felt that night. Like, 'This is my life. This is what's going on.' So, I recorded myself playing the drums and singing, freestyling, and then I had my engineer put some guitar licks on there. I immediately got into it and I asked someone to get it to Weezer."
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