Album: West Side Story (1957)
  • songfacts ®
  • Featured in the musical West Side Story, "America" has music by Leonard Bernstein and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim. When Stephen Sondheim talks about West Side Story decades after its Broadway debut in 1957, it is clear that for him, most of the songs did not hold up well over time. While many fans of the classic musical would disagree, Sondheim describes the score as "embarrassing" and said in 2010 that he could have improved on it if he had more time. As for "America," which is part of the Columbia Broadway cast recording and the 1961 film soundtrack, Sondheim said that the music is so fast that he typically would not even try to put lyrics to a song like that.

    Sondheim's lyrics to "America" actually were revamped for the film. Many people agree that the movie was toned down from the stage production and lacks some of the tension and drama that the Broadway show offered. The reworked "America" is part of that revision. Fans of the song may not be familiar with the original exchange between the Puerto Rican girls, Rosalia and Anita. In the stage production, Rosalia sings, "Puerto Rico, you lovely island. Island of tropical breezes." Anita responds, "Puerto Rico, you ugly island. Island of tropical diseases."
  • Stephen Sondheim questioned at the time whether he was the right person to write the lyrics. He said then that he had never even met a Puerto Rican, yet he was tasked with capturing the racial tension of the city and the era. The result was lyrics such as "Life is all right in America, if you're all white in America," which appear in both the film and stage version. Both versions also include the lines "I'll drive a Buick through San Juan, if there's a road you can drive on" and "I'll give my cousins a free ride, how you fit all of them inside." Regardless of which version you hear, the message still seems to be the same. As Anita sings the praises of America, she is letting the listener know that Puerto Rico will never be America and she is an American now.
  • In an ironic twist, Leonard Bernstein's music has a distinctive Spanish rhythm. The song is so upbeat and energetic and that were it not for the lyrics, "America" could very well be an anthem to Puerto Rico. Rita Moreno, who sings the song on the movie soundtrack, is a native of Puerto Rico. Chita Rivera, who played Anita on Broadway, is the American daughter of a Puerto Rican father. Their versions – especially Moreno's – remain the definitive recordings of the song and it is rarely covered.
  • The British rock band, The Nice, made the song almost unrecognizable with their version in 1968. However, the cast of the television show, Glee, gave it a try in 2011. The show made a notable change by weaving the white gang, the Jets, into the song. The Jets, not the Puerto Rican Sharks, sing about freedom in America for Puerto Ricans. "Free to wait tables and shine shoes," they sing. West Side Story might be remembered more for its songs about the forbidden romance between Tony and Maria, but it is "America" that strikes at the heart of why that romance was ever forbidden.
Please sign in or register to post comments.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Gary Louris of The JayhawksSongwriter Interviews

The Jayhawks' song "Big Star" has special meaning to Gary, who explains how longevity and inspiration have trumped adulation.

Corey HartSongwriter Interviews

The Canadian superstar talks about his sudden rise to fame, and tells the stories behind his hits "Sunglasses At Night," "Boy In The Box" and "Never Surrender."

Brenda RussellSongwriter Interviews

Brenda talks about the inspiration that drove her to write hit songs like "Get Here" and "Piano in the Dark," and why a lack of formal music training can be a songwriter's best asset.

Tom Bailey of Thompson TwinsSongwriter Interviews

Tom stopped performing Thompson Twins songs in 1987, in part because of their personal nature: "Hold Me Now" came after an argument with his bandmate/girlfriend Alannah Currie.

KissFact or Fiction

Kiss is the subject of many outlandish rumors - some of which happen to be true. See if you can spot the fakes.

Supertramp founder Roger HodgsonSongwriter Interviews

Roger tells the stories behind some of his biggest hits, including "Give a Little Bit," "Take the Long Way Home" and "The Logical Song."