River to Consider

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  • According to vocalist/guitarist James Petralli, White Denim's songs are the musical manifestations of abstract paintings or philosophical tracts. He explained to UK music magazine the NME: "The things that I like to read are generally abstract. I like patterns, I like reading poetry and avant-garde prose and I'm more interested in musical patterns in literature than I am in long-form narratives. I look at paintings and try to visualise an object or image, then assimilate how that makes me feel into a series of phrases and try to make it musical."
  • This meditative hoedown is loosely based on some excerpts from The Blue and Brown Books by Austrian philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein. Petralli told the NME: "The lyric-writing process is like an excavation, I'm trying to pull words and melodies out of what's already there."
  • Petralli told the NME the song is about, "creating work and weighing its importance."
  • Petralli's father is former Major League Baseball catcher Geno Petralli, whose career spanned 12 years, from 1982 to 1993.
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