Indian Sunset

Album: Madman Across the Water (1971)
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  • Geronimo is far right in this photo taken in 1886.

Comments: 11

  • Norm from BostonAnyone who likes this song needs to hear the Warren Haynes version, very transformative.
  • Susan In Fl from FloridaAlso yellow moon means harvest and abundance. Also noticed use of term teepee and Iroquois had long houses.

    Perhaps the person saying all of this was from a more western tribe than Iroquois?
  • Susan In Fl from FloridaI’ve always loved this song. It is very powerful. There is, however, a lot poetic license in it and it runs afoul of reality and geography. My impression is that the story is from an Iroquois, who were located in NE and into Canada. Yellow Dog, however, was Crow and their territory was/is Wyoming through Montana abd in N Dakota. Mention of Sioux gauntlet - would that be known in area of Iroquois? Sioux were in area now known as ND, SD, Wisconsin, Minnesota. I guess I was unaware that they traveled and mixed like that.

    However, that doesn’t minimize the heartbreak of the decimation of the indigenous peoples.
  • T from North Myrtle BeachThis song is another tapestry of the american west by Bernie Taupin written in blood and tears
  • Charger from TennesseeI have been a huge Elton John fan since the 70's and I must admit I was listening to MATW in the car the other day and this track came on. I was blown away again, I had forgotten all about this song over the years!! I hope he plays it when I see him in Chattanooga in March!!!!
  • Nathan from From The Country Of, CanadaTo Alexander of London England: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crow_Creek_massacre, European scalping was prevalent during the migration period into Europe, but that was 4th-9th century. Europe didn't make sustained contact with Europe (Vikings and some explorers happened upon Europe) until much, much later.
  • Hope from Boston, MaI first heard this song when I was about 10, but have recently re-discovered it. It is just so deep and moving, and it moves me to tears every time I hear it.
  • Charles from Bronxville, NyI recently returned from a trip with my family to Arizona where we spent time on the Navajo reservation. First of all their name is actually D'ni. If you visit Canyon De Chelley (Pr. De Shay) and find out about what happened there with General Sherman, it's hard to listen to this song without being moved.
  • Alexander from London, EnglandIt is well known that the White Man introduced the practise of taking scalps; the film "Soldier Blue" contains a graphic depiction of this.

    A Baron
  • Gregg from Coralville, IaAmazing song. I was literally moved to tears
  • Charles from Charlotte, NcDon't want to sound like I'm trivializing the suffering of the Native Americans, but weren't they the scalpers and the white man the scalpees?
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