Matthew And Son

Album: Matthew And Son (1966)
Charted: 2 115
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  • Up at eight, you can't be late
    For Matthew and Son, he won't wait.

    Watch them run down to platform one
    And the eight-thirty train to Matthew and Son.

    Matthew and Son, the work's never done, there's always something new.
    The files in your head, you take them to bed, you're never ever through.
    And they've been working all day, all day, all day!

    There's a five minute break and that's all you take,
    For a cup of cold coffee and a piece of cake.

    Matthew and Son, the work's never done, there's always something new.
    The files in your head, you take them to bed, you're never ever through.
    And they've been working all day, all day, all day!

    He's got people who've been working for fifty years
    No one asks for more money 'cause nobody cares
    Even though they're pretty low and their rent's in arrears

    Matthew and Son, Matthew and Son, Matthew and Son, Matthew and Son,
    And they've been working all day, all day, all day! Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Comments: 10

  • Dylan from FloridaJamie from Ohio said that this song can be heard at the end of Eclipse by Pink Floyd, but it is actually an orchestral version of Ticket To Ride by The Beatles. Though it would have been cool if it was this song instead
  • Bill from LondonMatthew and Son is the name of a company that was located across the street from where Cat Stevens went to high school. I know because my mother worked there.
  • Jamie from OhioIf you listen real closely... At the end of the song 'eclipse' from Dark Side of the Moon... After the elder man says... "It's all dark"... Listen- and you will hear this song playing.
  • Del from United StatesZef from La you sound anti semitic. That is ridiculous... the song is based on a firm and he used a local tailor's name. No place for hate in music.
  • Zef from LaIts a song about a stingy Jewish shopkeeper who overworks his employees. Never allowing anyone to relax, always chasing profits.
  • Kat from Adelaide, AustraliaI always think the sound of this song is so mid-sixties London. I like it though - it's aged well.
  • Dan from Los Angeles, CaThe melody of the bridge (the "He's got people who've been working" part) was later "borrowed" for the chorus of the Tears For Fears hit, "Mad World."
  • Jeff Barto from Huntersville, NcYou can hear Cat reference this song years later on the Album "Izitso." During the song "I Never Wanted to be a Star," he opens with "I was seventeen. You were working for 'Matthew and Son.' The Beatles met the queen. And I wrote, 'I'm gonna get me a gun." It was his way of reflecting back on several songs that helped his journey up to this point and this song. An underrated song in my opinion.
  • Adam from Sydney, AustraliaThis song always reminds me of the "Are you being served" theme song. The instrumentation is spot on - brass, harpsichord and chugging bass - and it has that sound that evokes visions of corporate London in the 60's/70's. A catchy tune that is timeless, but definitely from a bygone era.
  • Erin from Austin, TxI love the beginning to this song! It's great on road trips because it starts soft and gets louder and louder.
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