On the Border

Album: On the Border (1974)
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  • Cruisin' down the centre of a two way street
    Wondering who is really in the driver's seat
    Mindin' my business along comes big brother
    Says, "Son you better get on one side or the other"

    Oh oh, I'm out on the border
    I'm walkin' the line
    Don't you tell me 'bout your law and order
    I'm try'n' to change this water to wine

    After a hard day I'm safe at home
    Foolin' with my baby on the telephone
    Out of nowhere somebody cuts in and says
    "Hmm, you in some trouble boy
    We know where you've been"

    Oh oh, I'm out on the border
    I thought this was a private line
    Don't you tell me 'bout your law and order
    I'm try'n' to change this water to wine

    Never mind your name, just give us your number
    Never mind your face, just show us your card
    And we want to know whose wing are you under
    You better step to the right or we can make it hard

    Oh ooh, I'm stuck on the border
    All I wanted was some peace of mind
    Don't you tell me 'bout your law and order
    I'm try'n' to change this water to wine

    On the border
    On the border
    On the border
    On the border

    (On the border) Leave me be, I'm just walkin' this line
    I'm out on the border
    (On the border) All I wanted was some peace of mind, peace of mind
    I'm out on the border
    (On the border) Can't you see I'm tryin' to change this water to wine
    I'm out on the border

    (On the border) Don't you tell me 'bout your law and order
    (I'm out on the border ) I'm sick and tired of all your law and order
    (On the border) Sick and tired of it
    I'm out on the border
    On the border
    I'm out on the border Writer/s: BERNIE LEADON, DON HENLEY, GLENN FREY
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Comments: 3

  • Charlie Leeder from Trenton, New Jersey Wrong again John from Ridgewood New Jersey! “Say good night Dick” was the Rowan and Martin take On the original George Burns and Gracie Allen show, where George would turn to Gracie and say: “say good night Gracie “and Gracie would say: “good night Gracie.” Rowan and Martin’s took that bit from the old Burns and Allen comedy routine. Of course you would have to be old enough to remember when the dead sea was just sick, like me, in order to remember this!
  • Alan from Forest Acres, ScYes, I would say that "Rowan and Martin's Laugh In" was the source of "Say Goodnight, Dick" which Dan (Rowan) always said to Dick (Martin) at the end of the show, and Dick would reply "Goodnight Dick" and the credits would roll. The show began as a one time deal in September, 1967, and response was so good that the show was brought back as a weekly program until sometime in 1973. It replaced "The Man from U.N.C.L.E." on Monday nights at 8pm on NBC. Even Richard Nixon had a cameo on the show saying the line "Sock it to me!" either right before or shortly after he began his first term as president.
  • John from Ridgewood, NjWrong Dick. "Say good night, Dick," was made famous in the late 1960s on "Rowan and Martin's Laugh-in." Dan Rowan would end each show by saying it to Dick Martin, who would respond, "Good night Dick."
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