Beach Is Better

Album: Magna Carta Holy Grail (2013)
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  • Hit ya ass on the celly
    'Cause I ain't got time (time, time)
    To be arguing with your ass
    If you ain't really ready

    Girl why you never ready?
    For as long as you took
    You better look like Halle Berry
    Or Beyoncé, shit then we getting married

    I brought sand to the beach
    'Cause my beach is better
    You can keep ya beach
    'Cause that beach whatever

    Started out at The Darby
    Ended up at 1 Oak (Oak), Oak
    Left the house with a hundred grand
    Ended up near broke

    Don't get mad at me
    I'm buying bucket after bucket
    When it's gone I'm like, "Fuck it
    I'll replace it with another one", uh

    Can't take this money with you
    Burnin' shit up like I'm Richard
    Niggas asking, "Is the oven on?", Uh Writer/s: Marquel Middlebrooks, Michael Len Williams, Michael Williams, Shawn Carter
    Publisher: Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner Chappell Music, Inc.
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

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