Going Home

Album: Old Ideas (2012)
  • I love to speak with Leonard
    He’s a sportsman and a shepherd
    He’s a lazy bastard
    Living in a suit

    But he does say what I tell him
    Even though it isn’t welcome
    He just doesn't have the freedom
    To refuse

    He will speak these words of wisdom
    Like a sage, a man of vision
    Though he knows he’s really nothing
    But the brief elaboration of a tube

    Going home
    Without my sorrow
    Going home
    Sometime tomorrow
    Going home
    To where it’s better
    Than before

    Going home
    Without my burden
    Going home
    Behind the curtain
    Going home
    Without the costume
    That I wore

    He wants to write a love song
    An anthem of forgiving
    A manual for living with defeat

    A cry above the suffering
    A sacrifice recovering
    But that isn’t what I need him
    To complete

    I want to make him certain
    That he doesn’t have a burden
    That he doesn’t need a vision
    That he only has permission
    To do my instant bidding
    Which is to say what I have told him
    To repeat

    Going home
    Without my sorrow
    Going home
    Sometime tomorrow
    Going home
    To where it’s better
    Than before

    Going home
    Without my burden
    Going home
    Behind the curtain
    Going home
    Without this costume
    That I wore

    I'm going home
    Without the sorrow
    Going home
    Sometime tomorrow
    Going home
    To where it’s better
    Than before

    Going home
    Without my burden
    Going home
    Behind the curtain
    Going home
    Without this costume
    That I wore

    I love to speak with Leonard
    He’s a sportsman and a shepherd
    He’s a lazy bastard
    Living in a suitWriter/s: LEONARD COHEN, PATRICK LEONARD
    Publisher: Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind
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Comments: 1

  • Tj from TorontoI'm not religious and I know this is wacky, but (see similar comments on Hallelujah), a deal with the devil would explain this song, if the devil were writing it about Leonard:

    I love to speak with Leonard
    He’s a sportsman and a shepherd <-- took a gamble ...
    He’s a lazy bastard <-- made a deal to achieve musical success
    Living in a suit

    But he does say what I tell him
    Even though it isn’t welcome
    He just doesn't have the freedom
    To refuse

    He will speak these words of wisdom
    Like a sage, a man of vision
    Though he knows he’s really nothing
    But the brief elaboration of a tube <-- a worm? a pop hit (french)?

    He wants to write a love song
    An anthem of forgiving
    A manual for living with defeat <-- his deal
    A cry above the suffering <-- his suffering
    A sacrifice recovering

    But that isn’t what I need him
    To complete

    I want to make him certain
    That he doesn’t have a burden
    That he doesn’t need a vision
    That he only has permission
    To do my instant bidding
    Which is to say what I have told him
    To repeat
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