Bye Bye Love

  • I can't feel this way much longer
    Expecting to survive
    With all these hidden innuendoes
    Just waiting to arrive

    It's such a wavy midnight
    And you slip into insane
    Electric angel rock and roller
    I hear what you're playin'

    It's an orangy sky
    Always it's some other guy
    It's just a broken lullaby
    Bye bye love
    Bye bye love
    Bye bye love
    Bye bye love

    Substitution mass confusion
    Clouds inside your head
    Involving all my energies
    Until you visited

    With your eyes of porcelain and of blue
    They shock me into sense
    You think you're so illustrious
    You call yourself intense

    It's an orangy sky
    Always it's some other guy
    It's just a broken lullaby
    Bye bye love
    Bye goo' bye love
    bye bye love
    Bye bye love

    Substitution mass confusion
    Clouds inside your head
    Well, foggin' all my energies
    Until you visited

    With your eyes of porcelain and of blue
    They shock me into sense
    You think you're so illustrious
    You call yourself intense

    It's an orangy sky
    Always it's some other guy
    It's just a broken lullaby
    Bye bye love
    Bye bye love
    Bye bye love
    Bye bye love Writer/s: Ric Ocasek
    Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Comments: 5

  • Tim from ClarkdaleI know this is going to sound cliche but it this song reminds me of doing drugs, acid in particular. Especially the first two stanzas. I mean, it's true that I did drugs during this time period, but I still think there may be drug influence on the lyrics. I am wondering, Does anyone agree with me? Great song btw, One of my favorites.
  • Camille from Toronto, OhOh, and I'm surprised to see this song came out in 1978. I surely thought it didn't make an appearance until the MTV generation began in 1981.
  • Camille from Toronto, OhLove the song and vocals. I always thought the words were "It's orange-ade sky" and see now that the word was "orangy", pretty close but still not a word I've ever heard in any other song. I love the delivery of the song. The verses are sung intensely, while the chorus switches to a more abstract approach, just like a guy whose attention is distracted by looking up at the orangy sky. I think he's in love with a woman who keeps stringing him along. She has no intention of ever really being with him, and he's finally realizing that it's pointless to love her when she always with someone else. So he's giving her the big shove-off. Bye, bye love.
  • Eb from Fl Keys, FlI took a long break from secular music when I became a Christian. When I got back to it a bit, the Cars are one of the bands that I really appreciated musically, that I kind of tended to have overlooked and took for granted before. I really enjoy the poetry of the lyrics in "Bye Bye Love." Great, great song.
  • Steve from Chino Hills, CaThe Cars used a lot of abstract lyrics in their earlier albums. This song sounds like it's a break up song with hints of two timing. Great use of visualization of colors.
    A lot of the 70's music seemed to be geared more toward the sound than the lyrics. Bye, Bye Love doesn't make any great statements, but it did rock hard and moved the album toward the final number "All Mixed Up." I believe the Cars kept Bye, Bye Love very tight. Greg Hawkes kept the keyboard interesting without being annoying. Elliot Easton had a strong riff. It has a hard, destinctive sound that didn't escape the scope of the song and the song was neither too sort or too long.
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