Janie Jones

Album: The Clash (1977)
  • He's in love with rock'n'roll, woah
    He's in love with gettin' stoned, woah
    He's in love with Janie Jones, woah
    He don't like his boring job, no

    He's in love with rock'n'roll, woah
    He's in love with gettin' stoned, woah
    He's in love with Janie Jones, woah
    He don't like his boring job, no

    And he knows what he like to do
    He knows he's gonna have fun with you
    You lucky lady
    And he knows when the evening comes
    When his job is done, he'll be over in his car for you

    He's in love with rock'n'roll, woah
    He's in love with gettin' stoned, woah
    He's in love with Janie Jones, woah
    He don't like his boring job, no

    In the in-tray, lots of work
    But the boss at the firm always thinks he shirks
    But he's just like everyone, he's got a Ford Cortina
    That just won't run without fuel
    Fill her up, Jacko

    He's in love with rock'n'roll, woah
    He's in love with gettin' stoned, woah
    He's in love with Janie Jones, woah
    He don't like his boring job, no

    And the invoice it don't quite fit
    No payola in his alphabetical file
    Send for the government man!
    And he's just gonna really tell the boss
    He's gonna really let him know exactly how he feels
    It's pretty bad

    He's in love with rock'n'roll, woah
    He's in love with gettin' stoned, woah
    He's in love with Janie Jones, woah
    He don't like his boring job, no, no, no

    Let them know, let them know Writer/s: Joe Strummer, Mick Jones, Paul Simonon, Topper Headon
    Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
    Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

Comments: 1

  • Chris from Wayne, Nj, UsaTo the comment about Paul Simonon's simplistic bass playing during the Janie Jones chorus, I would point out that his playing during the VERSES is a bit oppositional (a descending figure, I believe, and one of the main hooks of the song), while not Entwistle or McCartney, was quite musical and, by all acounts, achieved with a yeoman's quality. Simple doesn't equal basic - often simple is classic.
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