Back Porch Bottle Service

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  • "Bottle Service" is typically offered at swanky clubs, where patrons can pay hundreds of dollars for a bottle of alcohol and room at a table. AJ McLean has a better idea: "Back Porch Bottle Service." It's when you're hanging out with your friends, enjoying cold beer and good company from the comfort of the porch. It's a lot less expensive.
  • After hooking up with Florida Georgia Line for "God, Your Mama and Me," Backstreet Boy AJ McLean decided he wanted to come up with his own version of the Nashville sound. He told Billboard it was his experiences in front of the FGL audiences performing the track that inspired him to dip his toe into country waters. This fun-loving summer anthem is the first fruit from his excursion away from the Backstreet Boys pop sound.

    "I'm coming in to disrupt country," McLean said. "It's kind of country/pop/urban with my own flair, but it still has that country story-telling vibe, as far as lyrics. But the songs are definitely gonna blow y'all away."
  • McLean told The Boot that he chose "Back Porch Bottle Service" as his leadoff country single as he wanted to kick off the project with a fun-loving summer anthem.

    "It's kind of tongue in cheek, you know?" he explained. "But at the same time, I was asking for a feel-good summer [song] that you can bump in your car, kick back with a nice cold brew and have fun with your lady."
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