Celebrity

Album: Havoc And Bright Lights (2012)

Songfacts®:

  • This broadside against the emptiness of the modern age's fame culture finds Morissette singing: "I am a tattooed sexy dancing monkey." She discussed her celebrity with The Guardian: "I think fame became exciting for me in the late '90s because I could actually use it as a means to an end. I could actually have it help me serve my vocationfulness. I could offer comfort and upliftment and be a leader and take on that responsibility, rather than see it as this daunting thing. Fame became a great tool. But I still have PTSD from the Jagged Little Pill era. It was a profound violation. It felt like every millisecond I was attempting to set a boundary and say no and people were breaking into my hotel rooms and going through my suitcase and pulling my hair and jumping on my car."
  • Morissette explained the song's meaning to Digital Spy: "It's a commentary on the bill of goods that is sold to us all about what fame can afford or yield," she said. "I was told it would raise my self-esteem and create profound friendships, whereas all it actually did was increase my self-doubt. Fame as an end in itself is pretty hollow, but you can instead use it as a means to an end - to offer commentary in an entertaining and palatable way. I'm now in my late 30s and realise that being in the public eye is a beautiful responsibility and I'm happy to take it on!"

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