Joshu-Ah

Album: Non-Stop Pub Sing-Along (1911)
  • Before he met up with R.P. Weston, Bert Lee wrote songs by himself and with other collaborators. In his 1985 Theatrephile article about the duo, comedian and music hall historian Roy Hudd said Lee had two enormous hits in 1910: "Hello! Hello! Who's Your Lady Friend?" and "Joshuah". They may have both been hits, but it remains to be seen if "Joshu-Ah" - as it is spelt - was worth the candle.
  • The sheet music held by the British Library credits JOSHU-AH Words and Music by GEORGE ARTHURS - BERT LEE, published by Leeds Music by arrangement with Francis, Day & Hunter, copyright Francis, Day & Hunter, 1911, renewed 1939, and copyright again 1949. The song is in 3/4 time, in the key of B flat (D-D), and the music is to be played "With good humor".
    And this for a not very witty love song! >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England, for above 2

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Waiting For The Break of Day: Three Classic Songs About All-NightersSong Writing

These Three famous songs actually describe how they were written - late into the evening.

Matt SorumSongwriter Interviews

When he joined Guns N' Roses in 1990, Matt helped them craft an orchestral sound; his mezzo fortes and pianissimos are all over "November Rain."

Benny MardonesSongwriter Interviews

His song "Into The Night" is one of the most-played of all time. For Benny, it took him to hell and back.

Which Restaurants Are Most Mentioned In Song Lyrics?Song Writing

Katy Perry mentions McDonald's, Beyoncé calls out Red Lobster, and Supertramp shouts out Taco Bell - we found the 10 restaurants most often mentioned in songs.

Allen Toussaint - "Southern Nights"They're Playing My Song

A song he wrote and recorded from "sheer spiritual inspiration," Allen's didn't think "Southern Nights" had hit potential until Glen Campbell took it to #1 two years later.

He Hit Me (And It Felt Like A Kiss): A History Of Abuse PopSong Writing

Songs that seem to glorify violence against women are often misinterpreted - but not always.