When You're Ready

Album: Local Honey (2020)

Songfacts®:

  • Brian Fallon kicks off his Local Honey album with this tune, which reads like a letter for his two children when they become adults. "I think it is a song that every parent can relate to," he told The Sun. "You have children and eventually they leave you and grow up and have their own lives, as they should. But that's frightening and it hurts to think about, so in the end you just hope they end up with someone who loves them as much as you do. I think that's a common feeling among us all, but it was on my heart to share."
  • In this life there will be trouble
    But you shall overcome


    Fallon told Kerrang: "It's a message to both of my kids, and it's also what I was trying to say to the world at that moment. That's why it's the first line on the record. I wanted people to know that it's so hard to be a human being, but you can overcome it. It's okay. And I believe in you! I'm also speaking to myself as much as I'm speaking to anyone else. That, to me, is incredibly important."

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