Consider Yourself

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  • Lyrics
  • This is one of the more memorable songs from the award winning musical Oliver!, which was written in its entirety by the London-born composer Lionel Bart (1930-99). The show is an adaptation of the famous Charles Dickens novel Oliver Twist; it opened in the West End in 1960, and on the big screen (directed by Carol Reed) in 1968.
  • "Consider Yourself" is a light-hearted song which is sung by the Artful Dodger when he invites an unsuspecting Oliver Twist to join a gang of boy pickpockets which is controlled by the sinister Fagin. In the song, Oliver responds, other voices join in, and the scene is imaginatively choreographed through the streets of Victorian London. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Alexander Baron - London, England, for above 2
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Comments: 1

  • Allen from Chicago, IlJack Wild who sang this song in the movie version went on to star in "H.R. Pufnstuf" and sang a version of this song at a live performance at the Hollywood Bowl with the cast from that show.
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