• This is the closing track of American indie band, Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros second album, Home. Frontman Alex Ebert told Artist Direct that he came up with the lyric and the melody without having picked up a guitar, something that doesn't always happen.
  • Ebert explained the song's meaning to Artist Direct: "There was this idea and this imagery of various people struggling," he said. "Then, in the best way possible, it just doesn't matter in the end. There's a relaxation of allowance and muddying everything up in the sense that I think a lot of our hard lines will dissolve in a great sort of spiritual rain, if you will. A lot of the divisions and the things so many people hold as paramount or important are going to be suddenly disappearing when the big rain happens. I mean that in a metaphorical sense. Maybe it's death or some other time, but I do really feel that."
  • The song's music video features the band's late fan, Sophia Glaser, wandering through a forest as it rains. Sophia sadly passed away in her sleep due to a brain hemorrhage after entering the clip in a contest, but Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros were so moved by her creation that they made it their official music video for the track.

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