Inferium

Album: Back to Oblivion (2014)
  • This Back to Oblivion track came from a jam day in the rehearsal space. Finch vocalist Nate Barcalow recalled to Artist Direct: "I just picked up a guitar and started playing some things. Everybody came in the room and was like, 'That's cool." We just jammed out until it was a song."
  • The song is the penultimate track on Back to Oblivion. Barcalow said it acts as a, "sort of the antithesis to the self-destructing theme of the album." He explained: "In the record, there's everybody's worldly place. By the end, everything has broken down and self-destructed. There are only a few people left called The Inferium. They're outcasts from society. They don't have much left in their lives except for love and a hope things will get better."

    "It's from the perspective of people who have been there and seen it all happen and come down," Barcalow continued. "Now, there's only hope and the chance to rebuild things. It's a great closer because it's the end of the record's story so to speak."
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