100
by Game

Album: The Documentary 2 (2015)
Charted: 82
  • This Cardo and Johnny Juliano-produced song finds both Game and guest artist Drake asking for those around to "keep it 100." Keeping it 100 refers to the concept of speaking the truth and being true to yourself – 100 percent. The main theme of the song is about the less glamorous side of fame and how it can erode trust among friends.
  • Drake previously made a pun out of the 'keeping it 100'' phrase on his Nothing Was The Same track "Too Much":

    Don't run from it, like H-Town in the summer time, I keep it 100

    The weather in Houston (H-Town) in the summertime consistently stays around 100 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • Game reminds us in his first verse about Drake's fight with Diddy in Miami, rapping, "Heard about the s--t with Diddy, so I came through to vest you up." Ironically that dispute allegedly stemmed from a disagreement over the beat for Drake's 2014 cut "0 to 100."
  • The song samples Peabo Bryson's 1977 hit "Feel That Fire."
  • The Theo Skudra-directed video finds Game welcoming Drake to spend some time in the streets of Compton. The visual is filled with The Game's signature color of red.

    Skudra was also responsible for creating the single art for Drake's "Started from the Bottom."

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