God and Country Music

Album: Honky Tonk Time Machine (2018)
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Songfacts®:

  • Slow and sparse, this song finds George Strait making the point that God and country music are the "two things still worth savin'." The track features George's 6-year-old grandson, Harvey Strait, as a special guest vocalist.

    "It took us several takes," said George of his grandson's contribution. "I went in there and I kinda did it with him, and then I would kinda just back out and leave him, and so that's how it worked out. But he was all for it. He was all about doing it. He got really involved in that record. For six years old [laughs], that's pretty good."
  • Luke Laird, Barry Dean and Lori McKenna co-wrote the song. Other collaborations between the three Nashville songwriters include Little Big Town's "Free" and Ronnie Dunn's "I Wish I Still Smoked Cigarettes."
  • Strait first played "God and Country Music" live during his December 7th and 8th shows in Las Vegas, as part of his ongoing Strait to Vegas residency.

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