Happiness

Album: Seventh Tree (2008)
Charted: 25
  • Will Gregory (synthesizer) told The Sun newspaper February 15, 2008 about this song that on the surface appears happy but has a dark undercurrent: "It's got that kids, mums and dads sing-along feel at the end but I think it's not quite as happy as all that." Alison Goldfrapp added: "What a wonderful idea but how the hell do you get happy? What is happy and how bloody long is it going to take to get really happy. It's something that we're all trying to strive for but there's the idea that you can't buy happiness."
  • The music video takes its inspiration from a scene in the 1953 MGM musical Small Town Girl. The original jump dance, which was performed by Bobby Van, has been referenced in a number of commercials and videos.
  • Will Gregory (synthesizer) told the Daily Mail April 18, 2008 about this song's 'slighty nutty' pop sound: "We thought we needed to be more psychedelic. But neither of us knew what psychedelic meant. I think it was our word for dreamy."
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Comments: 1

  • Joel from Princeton-plainsboro, NjVery Beatlesque.
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