Servant King

Album: Meekness and Majesty (1983)
Play Video

Songfacts®:

  • The son of Baptist pastor, the Revd. M. D. Kendrick, Graham Kendrick trained as a teacher before embarking on a singing career in the early 1970s. A prolific writer of songs sung in British churches, this is one of his most popular tunes.
  • The song was written for the interdenominational British Christian gathering Spring Harvest, which takes place annually over the Easter school holiday period. Graham Kendrick told Christianity magazine: "'Servant King' was the title for Spring Harvest and it was sent out to several writers, including myself. I just found that funny phrase inspiring. We weren't being asked, 'Can you write a song with the words "Servant King" in it?' But it was those two words that set the juices flowing, because they were opposites."

    "If you are a lyricist, opposites always kickstart ideas; those two words don't normally sit together. So I just started to unpack that whole story. The obvious part of the story is the incarnation, 'From heav'n You came, helpless Babe…' And it's sort of unfolded from there."

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Jim McCarty of The Yardbirds

Jim McCarty of The YardbirdsSongwriter Interviews

The Yardbirds drummer explains how they created their sound and talks about working with their famous guitarists.

Dwight Twilley

Dwight TwilleySongwriter Interviews

Since his debut single "I'm On Fire" in 1975, Dwight has been providing Spinal-Tap moments and misadventure.

Motley Crue

Motley CrueFact or Fiction

Was Dr. Feelgood a dentist? Did the "Crüecifixion" really happen?

Stand By Me: The Perfect Song-Movie Combination

Stand By Me: The Perfect Song-Movie CombinationSong Writing

In 1986, a Stephen King novella was made into a movie, with a classic song serving as title, soundtrack and tone.

Protest Songs

Protest SongsMusic Quiz

How well do you know your protest songs (including the one that went to #1)?

Randy Newman

Randy NewmanSongwriting Legends

Newman makes it look easy these days, but in this 1974 interview, he reveals the paranoia and pressures that made him yearn for his old 9-5 job.