Can't See Straight

Album: Happy Accidents (2017)
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Songfacts®:

  • Jamie Lawson wrote this song with his label boss Ed Sheeran and Snow Patrol's Johnny McDaid. He recalled the collaboration during a Clash magazine track-by-track:

    "We'd already written one song in the morning out at Ed's house and after lunch Ed came back saying, 'We should do a song like this!' and started playing the chords and rhythm of the chorus. I've never seen anyone write as fast as Ed Sheeran. We traded chords and lyric changes like a tennis match with Johnny as the umpire deciding which idea would work best. I think it was done within the hour."
  • This was released as the lead single from Happy Accidents. Asked by HMV.com when the title came to him, Lawson replied:

    "Quite late in the process. I got married during the making of this record and I was looking back over things that were connected to that. The first message that my wife sent to me had the line 'Hooray for happy accidents'. She'd walked into the wrong room when she was supposed to be a stand-up comedian and I was singing my songs. She thought I was quite good, but not very funny!"

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