Andalé Pues

Album: Tunes Young People Will Enjoy (2002)
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Songfacts®:

  • This song has a secret. "No one would ever know, but this song has a line in it that is a tribute to a great Mexican musician," singer Jesse Valenzuela told Songfacts. "In one of the last verses I say something about hanging out in a bar 'where the Lalo records play.'" Lalo, as it turns out, is something of a hero to Jesse.

    Born on Christmas Eve, 1916, Lalo Guerrero began his illustrious recording career in 1938. He enjoyed enormous international success, writing and recording songs in virtually every genre of Latin music. He wrote about the plight of farm workers and illegal aliens, about civil rights activist Cesar Chavez, about Chicano history, and growing up in the Barrio Libre section of Tucson, Arizona. His songs have become standards in Mexico, and his parodies - such as "Elvis Perez," "Pancho Claus," and "No Chicanos On TV" - have brought smiles to generations of people all over the world.

    The 20-something Lalo worked alongside Robert Mitchum, Jane Russell, and Gene Autry in several small movie roles he landed while living in Hollywood. And years later, in a business investment that mirrors Ricky Ricardo's from I Love Lucy, he bought a nightclub where his own orchestra performed regularly.

    No stranger to awards, Lalo was decorated with them during his lifetime, not to mention being hosted by both the Carters and the Clintons at the White House. And in 1980 he was declared a national treasure by the Smithsonian Institution.

    Lalo passed away in 2005, and in 2006 PBS aired a documentary entitled "Lalo Guerrero: The Original Chicano." Talents such as Linda Ronstadt, Ry Cooder, Cheech Marin, Paul Rodriguez, and the members of Los Lobos contributed to the film, which documented his life and achievements.

    To learn more about Lalo Guerrero, visit his son's Web site at markguerrero.net.
  • "I really love Texas music," says Gin Blossom and solo artist Jesse Valenzuela, "and this song is sort of my tribute." It has an "old groove," like a Sam the Sham and the Pharaohs-era groove, he explains. The title of this song means "let's get going - now."
  • Although Jesse grew up in the Barrio Viejo section of Tucson, Arizona, and he is of Mexican descent, he says he doesn't travel to Mexico much. His friends like to tease him about it. "A couple of years ago I was on the road with an act on Interscope," he laughs, "We were working with a girl singer, we had a really terrific band, it was me and a guy named Nick Kirgo, and Gary Mallaber, who is a legendary drummer, he played with Steve Miller – he's actually the drummer on Van Morrison records, the early ones, like Wild Nights and Moondance. But Gary's a real pistol, he's a character. And we were driving back over the border from Mexico, and they stopped us. And Gary turns around and says, 'Jesse, show them your license so we can get back to LA, baby.'" (read the full interview with Jesse Valenzuela)

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