Hey Girl

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  • This song finds Lady Gaga bouncing verses with Florence + The Machine singer Florence Welch. Speaking on the BBC Radio 1 Breakfast Show with Nick Grimshaw, the American songstress revealed how the collaboration came about: "I started to work on an idea for a song that I really wanted to do with a girl. You'll see why when you see what the song is about... I just thought 'who do I want to sing with?' She's really to me if not the best, one of the greatest vocalists in the world. She's incredible."
  • Gaga told Elvis Duran of New York's Z100 the song's authenticity was enhanced by the two singers face-to-face interaction. "If you don't meet in the room and look each other in the eye," she said. "Florence and I, when we were working together, we cried, we laughed, we hugged each other."

    Gaga added: "I don't feel you can write a song with lyrics that you really capture the relationship between two people unless you have a real human connection."
  • The song was produced by Mark Ronson, "Recording her vocal and watching them write that song together really didn't feel much like work," the Uptown Funkster told BBC's Newsbeat. "It really was a pretty wonderful experience."
  • Gaga and Welch sing here about women supporting one another with an unconditional love. Gaga explained to The Sunday Times. "Many women, no matter their race, color, religion, go through the same issues with men, bodies, minds. A lot of women shut down, as they don't feel heard. It ain't easy. I know it is pulling me apart. Is it pulling you apart?"

    "I'd like women to hear the song and, when they walk into a bar and see a girl they've never met, they just go, 'Hey girl!,'" she added. "And that means, I know. We're in this bar, and these men are foolish, but I got you."
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