Commercial
by Lil Baby (featuring Lil Uzi Vert)

Album: My Turn (2020)
Charted: 23
Play Video

Songfacts®:

  • Here, Lil Baby raps two verses and a hook where he espouses his work ethic and boasts about his wealth, womanizing, and come-up from the hood. The title refers to accusations people have made that the rapper has sold out.

    They say I went commercial, I ain't know it
  • Lil Uzi Vert joins Baby on the track. The Philly rapper's verse was most likely recorded in the month before the song's release on February 28, 2020. This can be inferred by Lil Uzi's allusion to basketball legend Kobe Bryant's passing the previous month.

    I turned eight million right until I'm a quarterback
    Spent a million like I'm tryna bring Kobe back


    Five-time NBA champion Kobe Bryant died aged 41 on January 26, 2020, in a helicopter crash. The eight million is a reference to his number 8 jersey.
  • This is the second time Lil Baby and Lil Uzi Vert have worked together. They previously linked up on Baby's track with Gunna, "Life Goes On."

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