Apples

  • songfacts ®
  • Artistfacts ®
  • Lyrics
  • Lily Allen tied the knot with Sam Cooper, a builder and decorator, on June 11, 2011 at St. James church in Cranham, Gloucestershire, England. They have two daughters, Ethel and Marnie, but by the time she began writing for her No Shame album in 2014, the marriage was failing. This sparse piece finds the singer, whose parents Keith Allen and Alison Owen separated when she was four, reminiscing about the early days of their relationship, until the reality of their marital breakdown hits home.

    I'm just like my mummy and my daddy
    I guess the apple doesn't fall far from the tree


    "It was devastating," Allen recalled to the BBC. "Ethel, my eldest, was four when me and Sam broke up. It really felt like history was repeating itself and everything I'd worked so hard to [avoid], ended up happening."
  • Putting a crumbling marriage into a song is something most singers can't handle, but Allen says she in an "oversharer," so she didn't have a problem with it.
  • Allen tried to provide an idyllic setting for her family, in contrast to the fractured one she grew up in. When this dream life out in the countryside with her husband and kids fell apart, she took it hard. "I wanted to provide a perfect life for my kids," she said. "I f--ked it up for them."
Please sign in or register to post comments.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Barney Hoskyns Explores The Forgotten History Of Woodstock, New YorkSong Writing

Our chat with Barney Hoskyns, who covers the wild years of Woodstock - the town, not the festival - in his book Small Town Talk.

Goodbye, Hello: Ten Farewell Tour Fake-OutsSong Writing

The 10 biggest "retirement tours" that didn't take.

"Stairway To Heaven" Lawsuit: A TimelineSong Writing

Untangling the events that led to the "Stairway To Heaven" lawsuit.

Mike Scott of The WaterboysSongwriter Interviews

The stories behind "Whole Of The Moon" and "Red Army Blues," and why rock music has "outlived its era of innovation."

Phone Booth SongsSong Writing

Phone booths are nearly extinct, but they provided storylines for some of the most profound songs of the pre-cell phone era.

Lou Gramm - "Waiting For A Girl Like You"They're Playing My Song

Gramm co-wrote this gorgeous ballad and delivered an inspired vocal, but the song was the beginning of the end of his time with Foreigner.