I've Told Ev'ry Little Star

Album: single-release only (1961)
Charted: 7 3

Songfacts®:

  • "I've Told Ev'ry Little Star" is a song with an unusually distinguished pedigree for a pop song: It has music by theater composer Jerome Kern and lyrics by writer/producer/director Oscar Hammerstein II. Both of these are monolithic names in theater. Kern produced over 700 songs used in over 100 musical shows of both Broadway and Hollywood. Hammerstein, you will of course remember as one-half of Rodgers & Hammerstein. The song was originally written for the stage musical Music in the Air.

    The story of the two composers in fact has a dramatic hook hung upon it by this song: It seems that Jerome Kern collapsed on a street corner in New York in 1945, at the age of 60, from a cerebral hemorrhage. Upon his hospitalization, his longtime friend and collaborator Oscar Hammerstein was at his bedside. Hammerstein hummed the tune to "I've Told Ev'ry Little Star" to Kern and, encountering no response from him, knew he had passed on.
  • Linda Scott's version is the best-known today. She was on the Billboard charts' Top 40 twice more, with "Don't Bet Money Honey" at #9 and "I Don't Know Why" at #12, also in 1961. Scott hailed from Queens New York, and signed to Canadian-American Records while still in high school. This song was also her first hit, and the single went Gold.

    What became of Linda Scott? Well, her career wound down about by 1967, and then she continued her education, including serving in the US Army as a medical laboratory technician and picking up a degree in Theology from Kingsway Christian College and Theological Seminary. She later married a serviceman and had one child, and the latest anyone's heard is that she's teaching a music class at an academy in New York. It always seems to go this way with early teen pop singers.
  • And now for the moment David Lynch fans have been waiting for: "I've Told Ev'ry Little Star" was featured in the 2001 film Mulholland Drive. In fact, it was central to the film and a pivotal plot point as well; it's the song that walking-MacGuffin Camilla Rhodes (played by Melissa George) chooses for her audition in the film that director Adam Kesher (played by Justin Theroux) is casting. But it's kind of a stretch to say he's casting it - actually, he is under pressure from the classic Lynch counsel-of-vague-evil goon squad to put this specific actress in the role. They even tell him the exact words to say ("This is THE GIRL!"), which he does at the moment of truth over this very song playing in the background.

Comments: 3

  • Ray Ellery from Wadebridge Cornwall .ukI love this song it makes you feel alive and I bounce along to this,hope linda is o.k need a fan club
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn February 1st 1963, Linda Scott performed "I've Told Every Little Star" on the CBS-TV special 'Arthur Godfrey and the Sounds of New York'...
    Just under two years earlier on March 13h, 1961 the song entered Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart at position #86...
    {See next post below}...
    Exactly one year later on February 1st, 1964 she appear on 'American Bandstand' and performed "Who's Been Sleeping In My Bed?"; it would be her 11th and last Top 100 record, it remained on the chart for one week, right at position #100.
  • Barry from Sauquoit, NyOn July 23rd 1965, Linda Scott performed "I've Told Every Little Star" on the ABC-TV program 'Where The Action Is', she was also the show's co-host, with Steve Alaimo...
    Four years earlier on March 13th, 1961 it entered Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart at position #86; and on May 1st, 1961 it peaked at #3 (for 1 week) and spent 14 weeks on the Top 100 (and for 5 of those 14 weeks it was on the Top 10)...
    The week it was at #3, the #1 record was "Runaway" by Del Shannon and at #2 was "Mother-In-Law" by Ernie K-Doe...
    In 1962 she released another record with 'Star' in its title, "Count Every Star", it reached #41 and the B-side was "Land of Stars"...
    Her other Top 10 record was "Don't Bet Money Honey" in 1961, it peaked at #9, and its B-side was "Starlight, Starbright", and it made the Top 100 at #44.
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