Sweet Georgia Girls

Album: Mac Powell (2012)

Songfacts®:

  • Mac Powell is best known as the frontman of the Contemporary Christian band Third Day, but he is also a fan of the Nashville sound, and his first solo album is a full-on Country affair. "I grew up listening to Country music," he told Billboard magazine. "It was a big part of shaping me musically and I think that's pretty evident in Third Day music. There's always been little tinge of it."
  • This is one of several semi-autobiographical cuts on Mac Powell, though strictly speaking it's not totally true. Powell admitted to Billboard: "Like many writers, I tried to take some things that have happened in life, and tried to make a song out of it. I grew up in Alabama, and moved to Georgia, met my sweetheart, and now I have a house full of Georgia girls like the song talks about."

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