All We Make Is Entertainment

Album: Postcards From A Young Man (2010)
  • This track ties the collapse of British heavy industry since the 1980s to the parlous state of the music industry in 2010. Bassist Nicky Wire explained to Q magazine: "It's saying that all we make is entertainment and we're even trying to destroy that, to give it away, piss it away and degrade it down to nothing. It's the quintessential British thing to do."
  • The accusatory title refers to the evisceration of British industry. Wire explained to NME July 31, 2010: "After Labour there's nothing left we actually manufacture. The selling off of Cadbury was the last straw, the best chocolate in the world and we got rid of it. The fact that the only subsidized industry we've got in the UK is the banks… how surreal and awful is that? We could have nationalized the utilities and kept people employed but no, we subsidize the profiteering, evil banks."

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