In 'N' Out Of Grace

Album: Superfuzz Bigmuff (1988)

Songfacts®:

  • Mudhoney has always credited the writing of their tunes as a collaboration between the entire band, and the early classic "In and Out of Grace" is proof of this, as Mark Arm said in his Songfacts interview, "The main riff of that came from Matt [Lukin]. And then either Steve [Turner] or I - I'm not sure who - floated the idea of throwing in a bass and drum break, with a crazy double guitar solo, like something off the first Blue Cheer record [Vincebus Eruptum]."
  • One of the first releases on Sub Pop Records, Superfuzz Bigmuff was appropriately named after two kinds of guitar distortion pedals the band favored. This song is a great example of what would soon be known as "grunge," but was more commonly called "garage-punk" at the time.

Comments

Be the first to comment...

Editor's Picks

Glen Phillips of Toad the Wet Sprocket

Glen Phillips of Toad the Wet SprocketSongwriter Interviews

The "All I Want" singer went through a long depression, playing some shows when he didn't want to be alive.

Butch Vig

Butch VigSongwriter Interviews

The Garbage drummer/songwriter produced the Nirvana album Nevermind, and Smashing Pumpkins' Gish and Siamese Dream.

Leslie West of Mountain

Leslie West of MountainSongwriter Interviews

From the cowbell on "Mississippi Queen" to recording with The Who when they got the wrong Felix, stories from one of rock's master craftsmen.

Barney Hoskyns Explores The Forgotten History Of Woodstock, New York

Barney Hoskyns Explores The Forgotten History Of Woodstock, New YorkSong Writing

Our chat with Barney Hoskyns, who covers the wild years of Woodstock - the town, not the festival - in his book Small Town Talk.

Charlotte Caffey of The Go-Go's

Charlotte Caffey of The Go-Go'sSongwriter Interviews

Charlotte was established in the LA punk scene when a freaky girl named Belinda approached her wearing a garbage bag.

Matthew Wilder - "Break My Stride"

Matthew Wilder - "Break My Stride"They're Playing My Song

Wilder's hit "Break My Stride" had an unlikely inspiration: a famous record mogul who rejected it.