Album: Johannesburg (2016)

Songfacts®:

  • This is a track from Johannesburg, an Afrobeat EP recorded by Mumford & Sond with Senegalese singer Baaba Maal, South African pop trio Beatenberg and dance act The Very Best. The latter act is a collaboration between London-based DJ/production duo Radioclit and Malawi singer Esau Mwamwaya. The record was recorded by the collective of artists in Johannesburg during Mumford & Sons' early 2016 South African tour.
  • Marcus Mumford told Billboard magazine that he penned the song's lilting, clipped guitar figure, "immediately when we landed in Cape Town. I picked up a guitar and that was literally the first thing I played."
  • The song was debuted by all four acts in front of around 25,000 fans at Pretoria's Voortrekker Monument Amphitheatre on February 6, 2016.

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