Planetary (Go!)

Album: Danger Days: The True Lives of the Fabulous Killjoys (2010)
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  • Gerard Way delivers a strident call-to-arms on this blistering punk-funk track. MCR were inspired by the Rolling Stones and in particular their song "Paint it Black" for this cut. "Mikey, Gerard and I were listening to the Stones and we noticed how their songs are very repetitive but one guitar is playing throughout," guitarist Ray Toro explained to Spin magazine. "And the way we built a lot of the record was by taking it eight or 16 bars at a time and used melodies that would work over an entire verse. Which is kind of strange."
  • This is the lead song in the opening cinematic of Sony Playstation's Gran Turismo 5. MCR are big fans of the video game. "I remember playing it and loving it years ago," Toro told Spin."And I think you hear that song and it just makes you want to drive faster. There's so much energy on the track."
  • Gerard Way told UK newspaper The Sun: "You could probably hear 'Planetary Go' in a dance club but never with lyrics like those. One line says, 'Having fame is inject able, faith is unavailable.' Which are both really true. We have to make up our own faiths today. And music is one such faith."
  • Way described this to NME as "a dance song with a vendetta."
  • Way told British newspaper The Sun the theme of the album is "my take on the world, without bitching." He added: "It relates to the whole world kids are growing up in today. But without pandering to them or pretending to know them. Then there's the theme of staying free."
  • Way was asked in an interview with Artist Direct about the significance of the lyric, "Fame is now injectable" in this song. He replied: "That was big one for me. That was what I had been wanting to say. I wanted the lyrics to be direct but couldn't find my voice on that first attempt. I wanted them to be these slogans that you could put on a billboard or you could say as a pirate radio DJ. It's funny because all of the slogans are very interchangeable between the corporation, the DJ and the gangs. They're all using the same verbiage and language, yet it means something different depending on who's using it. 'Fame is now inject able' was a really big line for me. There are few lines on the record that stand out. 'Planetary (Go!)' has a lot of them. That's what I wanted say. I'm also saying, 'Faith is unavailable' as well. I feel like that's the kind of world we live in right now. Fame is injectable, but faith is unavailable to us."
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Comments: 1

  • Vicky from Chesapeake, Va"Gerard Way delivers a strident call-to-arms on this blistering punk-funk track. MCR were inspired by the Rolling Stones and in particular their song "Paint it Black" for this cut. "Mikey, Gerard and I were listening to the Stones and we noticed how their songs are very repetitive but one guitar is playing throughout," guitarist Ray Toro explained to Spin magazine. "And the way we built a lot of the record was by taking it eight or 16 bars at a time and used melodies that would work over an entire verse. Which is kind of strange" - above comment

    that is so awesome...i LOVE the R O L L I N G S T O N E S ,who r awsum!
    i love the songs...
    1.time is on my side
    2.congratulations
    3.little red rooster
    4.off the hook
    5.heart of stone ... i love this one, luv it!
    6.paint it black
    and......

    7. Sympathy For The Devil ...... this is the song that was played at my stepdads funeral, it was his favorite song :' ( miss him.


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