Album: The Black Parade (2006)
  • The opening track on The Black Parade, this song, originally titled "Father," is about the final moments of The Patient as he dies. The Patient is the main character of the album's storyline, and the listeners can hear his ECG monitor beeping, counting down towards his death. In the next song, "Dead!," the ECG is flatlined, to signify... well, death. >>
    Suggestion credit:
    Bailey - Belleville, NJ
  • The band opened their sets on The Black Parade world tour by wheeling frontman Gerard Way out on a hospital gurney while he sang the first few lines of the song.

Comments: 2

  • Indigo from Adelaide, AustraliaI always thought it was called Father until i bought the actual cd and it was changed to The End. i love this song and the story that goes with the whole album. this song sounds great live, but the version on the video here isn't as good.
  • Brad from Lexington, KyThis song sounds very similar to the opening track of Pink Floyd's "The Wall" album, "In the Flesh", but this was probably intentional.
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